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Do you have a stubborn problem or a barrier to progress that you’d like to deal with? Then you’ve come to the right place. I’m Robert Plamondon, a clinical hypnotherapist in Corvallis, Oregon. Hypnosis is not only fast, safe, and effective, it’s the most comfortable way of resolving your stubborn issues. Hypnosis lets you use all your hidden resources, from your most childlike and imaginative to your wisest and most mature, to solve your problems.

Hypnosis uses your childlike imagination to bring about change

Ready to get started? Schedule Your First Session Now, using my online calendar.

Hypnosis gets you unstuck

Hypnotherapy cuts to the chase and gets the job done. For example, take someone who wants to stop smoking and has tried nicotine patches, but they don’t help. Clearly, the problem isn’t nicotine, so what is it? I don’t know, but your unconscious mind does! At the end of the day, people do their own problem-solving and their own healing. The hypnotist just helps you into a state where your natural physical and mental abilities are closer to the surface. Once in hypnosis, the hypnotist guides you through a process of more fully realizing things you already knew, and more fully implementing things that, on some level, you already know how to do. Continue Reading...

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Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

Ego-Strengthening: The Forgotten Swiss Army Knife of Hypnosis [Video]

Like everything else, hypnosis goes through fads and phases. New and exciting techniques replace old, familiar ones, even when the old ones were better.

So the simple, old-fashioned hypnosis of yesteryear yields to fancier methods: guided imagery, indirect suggestion, age regression, and so on. Don’t get me wrong! I use all of these with excellent results, and I use guided imagery in every session. But there’s something primal about the simplicity of old-time direct suggestion: “You are a nonsmoker. You’ve already smoked your last cigarette. Tobacco no longer holds any attraction for you. You are a nonsmoker.” Simple, yet powerful.

Because some consider it old-fashioned, direct suggestion’s more interesting wrinkles are positively forgotten. Decades ago, a British doctor, John Hartland, developed a method he called “ego-strengthening.” This was described in his book, Hartland’s Medical and Dental Hypnosis.In this, he doesn’t mention the client’s specific problems at all during hypnosis, but instead gives general suggestion for physical and emotional well-being. Since hypnosis works on broad issues as well as on narrow ones, ego strengthening tends to lift clients’ spirits, energy, and outlook. This makes everything easier. Continue Reading...

Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

Let’s Stop Pretending We Understand the Human Mind

Brain from Pinky and the BrainHere are the rules of the therapy drinking game:

  1. Every time a therapist who isn’t a neurologist talks with confidence about the human brain, take a drink.
  2. Five minutes later, call 911, because you’ve had waaaaaay too much to drink.

Why all this brain talk? As far as I can make out, it’s because this was the kind of pseudo-scientific gibberish that was in fashion during their trainings. The brain is all medical-ish and scientific-y, and opposed, to say, the mind.

And when people run out of brain structures to blame, they might skip to something they have even less experience with: say, molecular biology. Neurotransmitters, anyone?

All of which adrenalizes my limbic system! Why? Because it violates an important rule of thumb: “The therapist is supposed to be at least as coherent as the client.”

Metaphor and Reality

Most human communication is metaphorical, and we’re all fine with that. When someone says, “I laughed my head off,” we understand. Communication is about picking the right metaphors. That goes double for therapy.

In hypnosis, in particular, metaphors add power through seeming simplicity. For example, of the interesting things about hypnosis is that everyone already knows what “going deeper” means, though hypnotists rarely explain it. All of us already know so much, and we can pick up so much just from context, that explanations are more a burden than a help. A word to the wise is sufficient. Continue Reading...

Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

Can Hypnosis Really Replace Vicodin and Percocet?

Hypnosis instead of pillsThese days, with too many people taking too many pills because they’re suffering too much pain, hypnosis for pain control is more important than ever.

A track record of pain relief. Hypnosis was pioneered by nineteenth-century surgeons, such as James Esdiale and James Braid, and pain control was one of the earliest uses of hypnosis. Chemical anesthesia (ether, chloroform) came later. And hypnotic pain control techniques have gotten better over time.

  • Hypnosis can help you:
  • Control pain without painkillers.
  • Reduce your dependence on painkillers like Vicodin (hydrocodone), Percocet (oxycodone), or even methadone.
  • Reduce withdrawal and cravings.
  • Increase the effectiveness of painkillers.

Does it Work?

Let’s look at some research findings:

“Randomized controlled studies with clinical populations indicate that hypnosis has a reliable and significant impact on acute procedural pain and chronic pain conditions.”
Patterson and Jensen. “Hypnosis and clinical pain,” Psychological Bulletin of the American Psychological Association, 2003

“A pain protocol including hypnosis reduced pain intensity, improved opioid efficiency, reduced anxiety, improved wound outcome while reducing costs. The protocol-guided use of opioids improved patient care without side effects, while hypnosis had significant psychological benefits.”
Berger, et al. “Impact of a pain protocol including hypnosis in major burns.” Burns, 2010. Continue Reading...

Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

Fibromyalgia: Can Hypnosis Help?

hypnosis can help fibromyalgia pain and fatigueWhile we’re waiting for scientists to figure out fibromyalgia, what can people do in the meantime? Because, sadly, fibromyalgia is one of those issues that baffles medical science: unknown cause, unknown cure, doesn’t show up in today’s blood-tests, and is generally mysterious.

How do we deal with a problem with an unknown cause? By turning to solutions where knowing the cause isn’t necessary. Suppose I were a tow-truck driver. If you called me to pull your car out of a ditch, I’d get it out even if you didn’t tell me how it got there. No problem.

Hypnosis for Fibromyalgia

Hypnosis works with fibromyalgia the same way it works for other issues: I get you into a hypnotic state where the usually inaccessible parts of the mind are listening, and give hypnotic suggestions for comfort, healing, stamina, enthusiasm, and well-being. The way I do it, I combine relaxation, direct suggestion, and guided imagery, approaching the problem from many different angles. Continue Reading...

Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

11 Symptoms That Show You May Be Depressed

Eeyore, the little depressed donkeyAre you depressed? And what does “depressed” mean, anyway? (And can hypnosis help with depression?)

To help with the first two questions, here’s an 11-point list from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America:

  1. Persistent sad, anxious or “empty” mood
  2. Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  3. Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  4. Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities, including sex
  5. Decreased energy, fatigue, feeling “slowed down”
  6. Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  7. Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  8. Low appetite and weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  9. Thoughts of death or suicide, suicide attempts
  10. Restlessness, irritability
  11. Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders and pain for which no other cause can be diagnosed.

A Hypnotist’s Comments on the List

Persistent Sad, Anxious, or Empty Mood

Piglet has anxietyThis is a strange one: Most people would agree that sad or empty matches up with “depressed” pretty well but not “anxious.” Depression is like Eeyore. Anxiety is like Piglet. Right?

Right. But that didn’t stop anybody from shoehorning anxiety into depression anyway. For example, this diagram, also from the ADAA, shows generalized anxiety disorder as being a mere subset of depression:

overlap_between_depression_and_anxiety

As a hypnotherapist, I use ordinary language rather than therapy-speak, so I’m free to avoid sloppy nomenclature. But some of my clients come in pre-confused by this sort of thing, and we need to take the time to distinguish between labels that actually describe the client’s experience and ones that don’t. Continue Reading...

Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.